Monday, September 8, 2008

'SMS forwarding is a bottleneck, which other handsets are easily integrated with'

‘iPhone poses security challenges’

Looks like the iPhone, which was launched recently in India with a lot of fanfare, may not be without its own set of hitches.
Rajat Khare, CEO, Appin Security Group (ASG) — an Information Security R&D organisation offering security services such as protection from hackers, application security, and piracy prevention — sees several challenges in the use of iP hone, at least in the early stages. He is of the view that without a proper convergent network in place, all the features that the iPhone has on offer cannot be fully utilised.

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2 comments:

Murali said...

From email...

From: Rajiv Kamal rajiv.kamal@gmail.com
Date: 2008/9/11
Subject: article "iPhone poses security challenges”- Feedback
To: dmurali@thehindu.co.in
Cc: bleditor@thehindu.co.in


Dear Sir,

W.r.t to article "iPhone poses security challenges" published on 11
September 2008, Please consider my comments.

I was amazed to see such an article and that in esteemed and
privileged space in the business line. The article was sub-standard
and lacked coherence. It may impress people who are not aware of
technology, but not others. Even for the former, it may not be
comprehendible what the Appin people tried to say. It was mis-leading
too.

The headline indicted something else and the content was categorically
different. In the whole article the stress was upon the un-utilized
featured of I-Phone, e.g. absence of 3G, our regulation of 2g ~3G
transition, lack of high speed data transmission, lack of video
camera. I was totally perplexed, how these things will pose security
threat? If I am not able to use 3G, or if I don't have a video camera
in phone, is it going to harm me or the society as a whole?

Secondly, the author mentions that SMS can be sent without being
displayed on screen and he symbolizes it as a great security breach.
Again, he failed to justify his point. How it can be. May be he has
greater understanding of technology, and some more deep insights which
we people don't have. In that case, he could have put the full
justification for the same, so that we humble people could have been
benefited.

Thirdly, if we talk about any feature of I-phone, there is nothing
new. Similar phones are already in market since long. One such example
is Nokia E51/ E65 launched in early 2008. These phones are fully
loaded feature rich phones with par technology. They even house the
much fussed about 3G and what's more, wi-fi too is equipped. Seems the
author forget them or disparage the poor phones. Aren't they any
security breach to him? They are not less that i-phone excluding at
looks and display front. Well, they have different OS called
S60V3.They are equally vulnerable to virus, Trojan attacks, and hacks.
Indeed I phone lacks some features like Infrared, WAP, Flash Player,
FM radio. (Source Compareindia.com by TV18 group)


I didn't get the whole idea of publishing this article. Is it a
popularity stunt for Appin or trying to create hype for I-phone
itself? This might have been well with local news paper but unfit for
e-world/ business line.


Hope The Hindu/ BL does not take as offence, and takes the above
content as feedback only.
**

Rajiv said...

Any comments??

wither by The Hindu BL Editors, or by authors?